To Catch a Triton |

When I first saw this motorcycle, it was in parts on a lift in our local salty brit shop.  I'd never seen a Triton up close, and knew immediately that this was a dream come true in slow motion for Thom.  I'd never seen him react to a motorcycle quite like this, and in the early days our conversations were almost always dominated by our two-wheeled dreams. This bike was to be the one.

 

Two years later, I saw him kick it to life. Two years is a long time to build and wait for a motorcycle you think about everyday.  In California we are blessed with riding all year round, which is a bit of a curse at times.  As soon as a project is running, I am often on the road immediately into the sunshine, and often neglect the time-consuming details that make a bike stand out above the rest.  Patience is a virtue, and the Triton is built of patience.

1962 Norton Slimline frame mated with a 750cc Triumph T140E motor.  JoMo cam, balanced motor with titanium valve springs and a splayed port head.

 

Norton short road holder forks with external springs and modified dampening.

 

Custom, hand-formed aluminum tank.

 

NOS swept back headers, Gold Star silencers.

 

Custom welded on rear frame loop with a Dresda boxed swingarm.

 

Clubman racing alloy upper and lower clamps.

 

LED signals and a classic Lucas tail light. Hoping to keep the law at bay while riding with no plates. 

 

Grimeca 41s front brake hub laced to 18" alloy shouldered rims with Buchanan spokes. Custom Barnett cables.

 

 

Adjustable clip ons with Magura levers and a whirlpool throttle.

 

 

Custom rearsets, Dresda motor mount plates.

 

 

 

After watching him wait two years for it to come together, we couldn't keep up with him or the bike.